Il miglior libro di Salman Rushdie del 2020

Ecco la classifica dei migliori prodotti per la categoria Libro Di Salman Rushdie:

I figli della mezzanotte: si tratta del più acquistato, ha ottenuto una recensione media di 3,9 con 33 recensioni

Quichotte: medaglia d’argento per questo prodotto, la recensione media è di 3,9 con 577 recensioni

L'ultimo sospiro del moro: terza posizione per questo prodotto, con una recensione media da parte degli utenti di 2,7 con 3 recensioni
OffertaBestseller No. 1
I figli della mezzanotte
33 Recensioni
I figli della mezzanotte
  • Rushdie, Salman (Author)

Recensioni del prodotto

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Affascinante
Affasci nante . Un Amarcord indiano. Peccato per l'assenza di note che spieghino alcune situazioni per chi non conosce l'India e il Pakistan.
Reale e magico abbinati con estrema maestria
Rosicchiare le prime pagine di questa voluminosa opera, è un compito arduo, eppure una volta intuita la chiava stilistica di Rushdie, resti abbagliato dalla monumentalità di queste pagine scritte. Libro emozionante, bello, unico! Le disavventure di Saleem Sinai (e dei diversi figli della mezzanotte), si accompagnano alle vicende politiche registrate dall'India di quel periodo. Un mix di magia e storia magistralmente amalgamati dall'autore!

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OffertaBestseller No. 2
Quichotte
577 Recensioni
Quichotte
  • Rushdie, Salman (Author)

Recensioni del prodotto

How did this get nominated?!
Possible the worst book I've ever read. But it arrived in one piece and on time...it went downhill after that! We read it as a book club universally agree it's time we would never get back!
a beautiful read
I loved this book . It is beautiful strange and atmospheric - possibly not for everyone but for me a work of a genius
A huge literary entertainment
This is probably the novel one might expect from an aging, highly educated, literary novelist of asian sub-continental extraction with a penchant for magical realism, living in America in the era of Trump, climate change and global extinction. It contains both novel and meta novel. The core story clearly has its origins in Cervantes, as Rushdie tells the story of an expatriate indian, Quichotte, living in America as he embarks on a journey across the continent with his imaginary son in search of his beloved, who has the self referential name of Salma R. The tale doesn't, however, restrict itself to Don Quixote, referencing everything from Ionesco to Disney's Pinocchio. As Quichotte travels, his story is entwined with that of the author writing him. Through this device Rushdie explores the autobiographical elements of the writers craft as aspects of his real life (and one suspects also Rushdie's own) are reflected in his hero's struggles. Indeed Rushdie himself occasionally appears in the novel's shadows. This meta level perhaps gives the book a slightly problematic note. In the story of Quichotte, the author makes extensive use of metaphor and magical realism. In the story of the author, Rushdie explains the meaning of such symbolism in pretty clumsy terms. The real strength of the book is its enormous breadth and depth. It is book which is absolutely crammed with ideas. It is a book which probably needs to be held shut with heavy duty elastic bands to prevent the contents from escaping. The physical and emotional journeys of Quichotte and the Author enable them to explore aging, death, grieving, filial estrangement, parental abuse, parental love, climate change, the expatriate experience, the asian experience in post 911 America, celebrity culture, increasing political xenophobia, the silicon valley culture, and on and on and on. The exploration of racism is handled cleverly. Quichotte and Sancho experience a form of stereotypical redneck xenophobia, being driven out of successive towns, accused of being Islamic terrorists. When a similar thing happens to the Author and son, there is a more hopeful picture of the hatred being more isolated, with the general public being more decent. This seems to be a call to pay less attention to sensationalism, and more to the essential decency of ordinary people. At the heart of it all, it helps that Rushdie is a beautiful writer, and this book is peppered with sentences so stunningly well constructed that I felt myself stopped in my tracks, smiling at the audacity. That audacity stretches to genre busting. I have often thought of magical realism as the literary cousin of fantasy and even sci-fi. Here Rushdie joyfully tramples over any such artificial distinction and gleefully mixes an exploration of the author's relationship with his creation with a a Sci Fi story akin to Baxter and Pratchett's Long Earth books. (Although Rushdie himself credits Arthur C Clarke.) Another possible criticism is one that might be applied to Rushdie's entire body of work, that this is all just too clever for its own good, but after a short consideration I decided that I don't care, this is just such a huge, ambitious, intelligent entertainment that I lost myself in the sheer enjoyment of reading it.

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OffertaBestseller No. 3
L'ultimo sospiro del moro
3 Recensioni
L'ultimo sospiro del moro
  • Rushdie, Salman (Author)

Recensioni del prodotto

Excursus straordinario in un subcontinente, una famiglia, un uomo.
Grandioso romanzo famigliare, punteggiato da grandi eventi dell'ultimo secolo di storia indiana, raccontati dall'ultimo discendente di una immaginaria dinastia. Ebrei fuggiti dalla Spagna,, gangster musulmani, mafiosi hindu, donne fatali, artisti pazzoidi e "freaks of nature" si incrociano, amano, odiano e combattono in un turbinio di realismo magico che a mio parere ricorda, superandoli, tanto Eco quanto Garcia Marquez. Tra immagini grandiose ed excursus eruditi, in filigrana, la condanna dell'autore di tutte le ideologie settarie e religiose. Assolutamente consigliato.
Three Stars
Scritto molto bene, ma difficile da seguire

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