Il miglior libro di Henrik Ibsen del 2020

Ecco la classifica dei migliori prodotti per la categoria Libro Di Henrik Ibsen:

Casa di bambola: si tratta del più acquistato, ha ottenuto una recensione media di 3,4 con 24 recensioni

Hedda Gabler: medaglia d’argento per questo prodotto, la recensione media è di 5,0 con 1 recensioni

A Doll's House: terza posizione per questo prodotto, con una recensione media da parte degli utenti di 4,3 con 384 recensioni
OffertaBestseller No. 1
Casa di bambola. Ediz. integrale
24 Recensioni
Casa di bambola. Ediz. integrale
  • Ibsen, Henrik (Author)

Recensioni del prodotto

uno dei più bei libri mai letti
arrivato in tempo e integro.
Bellissimo
Una scoperta veramente sorprendente
Splendida Nora
In televisione ho visto questo lavoro di Ibsen, tanti anni fa, e mi ha talmente colpita il personaggio di Nora che non l'ho più dimenticato. La sua dignità, il coraggio che ha di voler affermare sé stessa contro tutto e tutti, che la considerano una sciocca bambolina, mi è rimasta talmente impressa, che credo mi abbia aiutato diverse volte nella mia non breve vita.

Acquista su Amazon
OffertaBestseller No. 2
Hedda Gabler
1 Recensioni
Hedda Gabler
  • Ibsen, Henrik (Author)

Recensioni del prodotto

Consigliato
Pacco arrivato in data stabilita. Consigliatissimo, nessun intoppo, nessun danno. Puntuale e preciso. La lettura scivola via e tu prende. Consigliatissimo. Buona lettura

Acquista su Amazon
Bestseller No. 3
A Doll's House
384 Recensioni
A Doll's House
  • Ibsen, Henrik (Author)

Recensioni del prodotto

Enjoyed it a lot
This is the first time I've read any Ibsen and I've got to say I'm not a big play reader - it's not really my sphere of interest. However, I did enjoy reading this, although I enjoyed it more as it progressed. Therefore Act I didn't really find all that interesting, Act II, I enjoyed more and I felt that Act III was just masterly in the way that everything was brought together and Nora comes to her epiphany moment in her realisation of the inequality of her marriage. I loved the point in Act II, where the reader's attention is drawn to the similarities between Nora and the supposedly despicable Krogstad. I also loved the way Mrs Linde and Krogstad renew their relationship, he initially doubting her intentions and her "Nils, a woman who has once sold herself for another's sake doesn't do it a second time." Helmer's selfishness and moral cowardice is just brilliant. I've recently read a book of critical essays by Margaret Atwood in which she argues that certain types of what are popularly thought of as low- and high-brow literature have definite things in common and I've got to say that parts of this play struck me as being very similar to a Mills and Boon. It's certainly undeniable that in these romantic novels dissimilarities and misunderstandings about the heroes' and heroines' characters are quite often central to the obstactles in their relationships. There was certainly something about Helmer's initial response to him learning of Nora's "crime" which was reiminiscent of this type of book. It's only a thought - anyway, I like Mills and Boons - and I liked this play too.
A Masterpiece
Ibsen’s famous play, probably the most popular nowadays shouldn’t really need much introduction as chances are that you are already aware of it if you are looking at this item. I should stress however that if you are more than just a general reader for instance a student, then this particular edition will not really be ideal for you, as there is no introduction, notes or analysis, something which you will probably need. Set over a Christmas it emerges that Nora has been keeping a very large secret from her husband Torvald. But as events start to pan out she has to tell her friend Christine, what she has done. Fearing for her husband’s health Nora managed to get a loan, but how she got it wasn’t strictly honest. With the man she got the loan from likely to lose his job he has come to Nora with intent to blackmail. As the play unfurls we see how what at the beginning looks like a normal happy marriage isn’t really so. As layers are drawn back we see that there are some problems here. Ibsen showed here how a marriage can start to fall apart and indeed this does read in some ways like a kitchen sink drama, something that really never started to come about until the 1950s. Ibsen showed his audience true life and with it glaring back at them this did cause quite some controversy throughout Europe. Starting over the issue of money and the need of it for the Helmer family to provide suitable convalescence for the man of the house, this then goes on to the effects caused by Nora managing to raise it in secrecy, and with the final denouement how this could affect the family name and honour. We read all this here and what course of action is taken by Nora at the end, and what really gets her goat about her marriage. Due to the nitty gritty realism here this was so controversial in Germany, that even to be performed the ending had to be altered, thus taking away from the full impact of the whole play. This play has been hailed as a piece of pro- feminism, and yes it can be said that it is, but Ibsen never set out to create anything pro-feminist, instead he wrote and based this on a true event. This is always a pure pleasure to read and if you are into drama then this is a must have if you have not already got a copy, or if like me, ideal to download to your kindle so you have a copy to carry around with you.
Clear layout, compelling read.
Clear layout. A fascinating play giving an insight into Ibsen’s view of the role of married women. I was engrossed!

Acquista su Amazon